Animal’s Daily Insurrection News

Imagine the outcry from the legacy media were the Republican mayor of a major city openly call for armed insurrection.  Yet a Democratic mayor, namely Chicago Mayor Beetlejuice, can do that, and as our pal Robert Stacy McCain points out, the reply from the legacy media is a huge collective yawn.  Excerpt:

The year-to-date homicide total in Chicago has already topped 200, but the city’s Amphibian-American mayor isn’t worried about that. In an average week, 11 people are murdered in Chicago. You might think reducing this deadly violence would be a top priority for Mayor Lori Lightfoot, a task that would absorb all of her attention. Nevertheless, she manages to find time to spend on Twitter, warning her “community” about the real danger — the United States Supreme Court.

In the aftermath of the city’s deadliest year since 1996, how does a “call to arms” against the Supreme Court fit on Lightfoot’s agenda? Chicago just celebrated Mother’s Day weekend with 24 shootings, including six fatalities. The previous weekend was the most deadly of the year, with 32 shootings including seven fatalities. That’s just shootings, to say nothing of other crime in Chicago, such as the carjacking rampage in which more than 500 people have been carjacked so far this year. The violence in Chicago is so out of control that the police department just issued a memo canceling “all days off . ;. . for one full week between May 24 and 31” because of fears of mayhem in the city around Memorial Day.

While Mr. McCain makes some excellent points about Mayor Beetlejuice bloviating while the city of Chicago collapses into anarchy, where is the outrage over her call for armed insurrection?  Because if the shoe was on the other foot, if, say, Governor DeSantis replied to a Supreme Court decision by describing it as a “call to arms” the RHEEEEE from the legacy media would measure on the Richter scale.

This, True Believers, is just another example of principals over principles – and an added example of why the general populace holds the legacy media in such low esteem.  This naked partisanship is growing old, and the “established” media hasn’t  yet figured that out.

But that’s OK, because we now have a Ministry of Truth to help all us dumb schlubs out here in flyover country understand what is acceptable knowledge and what isn’t.

Kakistocracy achieved.

Animal’s Hump Day News

Happy Hump Day!

As I’ve noted (only yesterday in fact), spring comes late to the Great Land.  But we share a  harbinger of spring with most of the upper tier of the Forty-Eight, that being the return of our robins (Turdus migratorius).

Our robins have only been back for a week or so, and they’ll depart in mid-September, if last year was any gauge.  They’re mostly ground-feeders and depart about the time snow starts to fall.  We had them in our old digs in Colorado, too, but there they were year-round residents.

Here, they are again the sign of spring that they were in the northeast Iowa hills of my youth.  There’s one singing in the top of one of our big birch trees as I write this, and it’s nice to hear him; they have a cheery, pleasant song, and it’s a promise of warm, sunny days ahead.

Now then…

On To the Links!

I live in a free speech zone.  It’s called the United States of America.  Still, good for Georgia.

Maybe.  Maybe not.  The GOP hasn’t exactly been on fire about pursuing corruption.

WH Tacitly Endorses Intimidation of Supreme Court Justices.  I can’t add anything to that.

Biden speaks, a nation groans.  Yeah, with embarrassment.

Well, this wouldn’t be good.

This wouldn’t be good either.

Get woke, go broke.

Oh, rats!

Eleven corrupt speed-trap towns.  What assholes!

Dammit, Bill Maher, stop  making me agree with you!

Human brains were bigger 3,000 years ago.  No television, I’m guessing.

On de-extinction.  Good, I want to go mammoth hunting!

Phrases you never heard before:  “Mouse sperm hook.”

Mob secrets coming to light.

Groomer breakfast cereal?

This Week’s Idiots:

The Nation’s Elie Mystal (Repeat Offender Alert) is an idiot.

The Nation’s Sasha Abramsky is an idiot. 

The Nation’s Joan Walsh (I’m sensing a pattern here) is an idiot.

Vox’s Ian Millhiser is an idiot.

Robert Reich (Repeat Offender Alert)  remains a sawed-off runt, and an idiot.

New York Magazine’s David Klion is an idiot.

USA Today’s Richard Wolf is an idiot.

Vox’s Rebecca Leber (I’m sensing another pattern here) is an idiot.

USA Today’s Jill Lawrence is an idiot.

MSNBC’s Hayes Brown (Repeat Offender Alert) is an idiot.

MSNBC’s Ja’han Jones (I’m sensing yet another pattern here) is an idiot.

Salon’s Chris Hedges is an idiot.

OK, that’s all I can take this week.  I actually do read these, you know.

This Week’s Cultural Edification:

In his eponymous 1980 album, Peter Gabriel had a number of good tunes, but one I’ve always found interesting is the song Games Without Frontiers. 

While this song is often described as an ‘anti-war’ song, and it is that, it seems to me to spend more verses poking fun at the whole world of international relations, not only war but also our attempts at diplomacy.

It’s an interesting listen, and the video – well, the video is very Eighties.  Here, check it out:

Animal’s Daily Great Land News

Before we start, check out part II of my latest series over at Glibertarians!

Spring has come to the Great Land in full force, with snow melting all over, landslides blocking roads and ice dams flooding small towns.  But that’s life up here; we’re a lot closer to nature untamed than most of the more-developed Forty-Eight.

Last weekend Mrs. Animal and yr. obdt. took a drive up to Denali, just to see how the springtime was looking that far  north.  We hit some light snow around Broad Pass, but  it wasn’t sticking, and the highway remained clear and no more than damp.  It was a pretty drive, but north of Talkeetna there is still a lot of snow on the ground.  If any of you ever visit Alaska, this is a beautiful drive any time of year (although it can be a bit dodgy in winter) but in summer it’s one of the greatest displays of scenery you’ll find anywhere.

What’s really fun to contemplate, and what is hard to wrap your mind around until you’ve been here a while, is the scale of this place.  There are a few places in my old Colorado stomping grounds where you can park your truck and walk for twenty miles before you cut another road.  There are lots and lots of places up here where you can walk for a few hundred miles and never see any signs of humans.  There are places along the Parks Highway where you can walk due west and hit the Bering Strait before you encounter anything built by humans.  Oh, there are some villages out in the bush, but they’re pretty scattered, and it’s a big, big country out there.

And that’s a big part of the appeal.  This is the only place I’ve ever lived where I have never felt hemmed in.

Back to spring arriving.  I’ve been going over fishing tackle.  New line on the reel, checking that I’ve got all the spinners, lures, and so forth that I’ll need.  Last year we didn’t meet the residency requirements; this year we have no such issues.  Let the fishing begin! There are a bunch of salmon, trout and maybe some halibut with my name on ’em.

Goodbye, Blue Monday

Goodbye, Blue Monday!

Thanks as always to Pirate’s Cove, The Other McCain, Bacon Time and Whores and Ale for the Rule Five links!

Ever wonder why folks on the political Left come so unglued when things don’t go their way?  Issues & Insights has some thoughts.  Excerpt:

There are plenty of candidates for the most hinge-free response to the draft. But before we go further, we’d like to highlight Massachusetts Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren descent into madness. Watch the video with the audio muted. Does her body language, the spasmodic gesturing, the pointed finger remind anyone of a 20th century figure whose speeches we’re used to seeing in black-and-white newsreels?

Heaven help us.

Warren’s fevered tirade clearly shows we have reached the point that the left has decided that policy will not be made like sausage but through tantrum, intimidation, and riot. If the Supreme Court doesn’t rule its way, then the Court is illegitimate, stolen and therefore has to be destroyed to save itself from making incorrect rulings. As John Daniel Davidson so eloquently noted for The Federalist, “whenever the left feels they have lost control of an institution, they try to destroy it.”

But what should we expect given the childish outbursts and lawlessness following the 2016 election of Donald Trump? The Antifa riots and violent Black Lives Matter mobs that were tacitly approved, and in some cases supported, by the Democrats? And a hard-left press that strangled its last shred of credibility by trafficking the Russian dossier it new was fake, and then insisting in the most maniacal ways imaginable that only it can determine what is acceptable speech in the U.S.?

If anyone wonders where this started, we need go back no further for the answer than 2000, when Democrats demanded the Florida presidential ballots be recounted and recounted until enough votes could be found to give Al Gore the state, and the White House. A peaceful transition of power was not in their plans.

What I don’t see mentioned in this article is something I think the authors overlooked – the fundamental insecurity behind this kind of behavior.  I’m not certain as to the source of that insecurity.  Maybe it’s because the people acting out like this know, at some deep hidden inner level, that their policy proposals are horseshit.  Or maybe it’s because they know that, given the chance for an honest vote and full airing of both sides, the average voter would reject their horseshit policy proposals.

In either case, leftists have been trying for some time to shift the Overton window in American politics, but it seems increasingly that they have succeeded mostly in moving the Overton window of the Democrat Party; that is, they have become the party of moochers, looters, ivory-tower academics and a small urban elite.

That’s leaving the GOP a lot of room in which to operate.

Rule Five Gas Prices Friday

I stumbled across this from The Heritage Foundation the other day, explaining how high gasoline prices appear to be the result of intentional acts on the part of the Imperial City.  Honestly, if you wanted to drive gas prices through the roof, what would you do differently?  Excerpt:

Throughout his presidential campaign, Biden promised to wage war on the U.S. energy industry. “I want you to look at my eyes,” he said. “I guarantee you. I guarantee you. We’re going to end fossil fuel.” That’s pretty unequivocal. And his policies reflect that.

On his first day in the Oval Office, Biden pulled the plug on the Keystone XL pipeline and put a “temporary moratorium” on oil and gas activities in the Alaska National Wildlife Reserve. A week later, he “paused” new oil and gas activities on federal lands and waters and set in motion an army of regulators to begin the process of restricting financing for, access to and use of conventional energy.

Also in January 2021, Biden formally recommitted the United States to the Paris Climate Accords, the global carbon-reduction agreement that, if taken seriously, would cripple the U.S. oil industry and the entire economy—and do so without the consent of Americans’ representatives in the Senate. His nominee to be vice chair of the Federal Reserve famously argued that the central bank should restrict access to capital for energy companies—“a dying industry,” she called them—to punish them for their sins against the climate.

See what I mean?  From literally the very beginning, every action the Biden(‘s handlers) administration has increased energy costs.

But wait!  There’s more!

None of these choices was forced on the president. In every case, he intentionally sought policies and personnel who he knew would cut domestic production of and access to fossil fuels—even as the world’s emergence from the COVID-19 pandemic drove global demand for energy ever higher throughout 2021.

Nor could Biden have any doubt that his regulatory war on fossil fuels would, indeed, drive up the price of fossil fuels. In California, where successive progressive governors and legislatures have restricted drilling, mandated renewable fuels, capped carbon emissions, blocked new projects and hiked taxes, gas today costs not $4 per gallon, but $6. Gov. Gavin Newsom is developing a plan to ban the sale of internal combustion engines from the state altogether—even lawn mowers—no matter the inconvenience or expense.

These are the same kinds of laws that Biden and his team want to impose on the whole country—and with them, $6 gas prices.

Let’s be clear about one thing:  Laying this at President Biden’s feet is probably a tad unfair.  It’s become very clear in recent weeks that he has very little capacity to understand, much less direct, these actions.  He is little more than a mouthpiece for unelected persons behind the scenes who are, yes, very likely deliberately driving this agenda.  They reckon, after all, that it won’t affect them; they demonstrate here the same blindness that affects many in leftist movements, who always seem to have to learn the hard way that, when the glorious People’s Revolution comes, they won’t be the apparatchiks with the clipboards, but more likely the ones tied to posts looking at rifles from the wrong side.

Here’s the onion:

Politicians aren’t engineers or scientists. They can’t make renewable energy better and cheaper. But they can make oil and gas more expensive—ideally, so expensive that the “sustainable” energy sources they like seem comparably affordable.

The Biden energy agenda isn’t a conspiracy. It is an uncomplicated array of policies all aimed at one obvious goal—a goal that Biden himself, his party and the Left openly support. Anyone confused about why the president isn’t acting to lower gasoline prices in the near term and boost America’s energy production and infrastructure in the long term already have their answer.

The only problem Joe Biden sees with $4.23 gas is that it’s too low.

And that’s the crime behind the whole thing:  These people would be much happier with $6.00 gas.

There’s an apocryphal story about the Duke of Wellington, in which he rails against passenger railways, claiming they would “promote unrest by allowing the lower classes to move too freely about.”  What an asshole!  And that’s the same kind of attitude that’s driving this crap in the Imperial City today.

Animal’s Daily Leaky News

There’s a lot of bandwidth being expended on the (likely) Supreme Court decision that was leaked, ostensibly overturning Roe v. Wade.  But it’s not the possible overturn that I find concerning – I agree with those who think Roe was a massive overstep of authority by the Court, but what I’m concerned with is the leak itself.  Excerpt:

Almost to a person, from Minority Leader Mitch McConnell on down, Republicans have condemned the unprecedented leak. Hawley clerked for Chief Justice Roberts and still remembers the lecture he received on Day One of his clerkship. Long story short, he told RCP, “You are ethically bound never to disclose the details about an opinion or a case.” Each of the clerks, usually a number between 27 and 36 per term, knows the rules. It is why the high court is considered leak-proof. It is also why when Hawley heard the news, he was left “in shock and disbelief.”

The Supreme Court operates in secrecy. One relatively recent and former clerk told RCP that discretion is necessary for justices to debate in good faith, often trading incomplete drafts of opinions between themselves and across the ideological spectrum. Take that away, the former clerk added, allow the court to leak like, say Congress, and “it is very dangerous both for how it functions but also for the justices’ individual personal safety.”

Hawley agreed on the immediate practical matter. He called on Congress to provide the justices with additional security if needed, and then he declared that his old boss was weathering “unprecedented pressure tactics,” an attack “on the integrity of the court.” Roberts condemned the leak in a statement, calling it “a betrayal of the confidences of the Court.” He directed the Marshal of the Court, security police answerable strictly to the judiciary, to immediately launch an investigation into the source of the leak. Hawley said his legacy hangs in the balance.

Note again the lead sentence in that second paragraph:  The Supreme Court operates in secrecy.  Whoever has violated that trust must be identified, charged, prosecuted, and punished.  If possible under the law, I’d like to see the leaker barred for life from working in any legal or legal-aide position, anywhere.

What’s concerning about this isn’t necessarily the leak itself.  It’s the (almost certain) reason behind the leak.  Whoever leaked this, and I’d bet serious money on this, did it to try to intimidate the Court into changing this draft opinion.  And that assessment of intent is supported by the uncanny speed with which pro-abortion protestors showed up at the Supreme Court building.  So, not only a breach of security – not only a blatant attempt at intimidation of Supreme Court Justices – but likely a criminal conspiracy as well.

I’d ask where this all ends, but history is replete with examples as to how this kind of thing ends, and it never ends well.

Animal’s Hump Day News

Happy Hump Day!

It’s been a busy couple of weeks here at the Casa de Animal, and we’ve got some busy weeks ahead.  Snow is still melting, but we’re starting to see patches of actual yard surface.  Getting hit by two major winter storms in February left a lot of snow on the ground even for south-central Alaska, and with the snow’s melting comes a lot of spring cleanup.

We’re also tilling up the garden plot and prepping the greenhouse for sweet corn, potatoes, tomatoes and whatever else we can grow.  Right now, given the current state of national affairs, being as self-sufficient as possible just seems like a good idea.

If possible, True Believers, I suggest you do likewise.

Now then…

On To the Links!

No shit, Sherlock.

Grafters gonna graft.

The New York Post belabors the obvious.

Welcome to the 1970s.

Why humans sleep less than other primates.  Interesting.

I’m not anxious to try Windows 11, and my big main computer is “not compatible,” but if you’re wondering how the roll-out is going, here’s where to find out.

DeSantis on Constitutional Carry in Florida.

Color me skeptical.

Imagine a Darwin Award for an entire state.

Sooner or later this kind of shit is going to explode.

Joe Manchin (D-WV) endorses a Republican.

It took a Carter to bring us a Reagan.

I’m your huckleberry.

This Week’s Idiots:

The Guardian’s Siva Vaidhyanathan is an idiot.

The New Republic’s Daniel Strauss is an idiot.

MSNBC’s Hayes Brown (Repeat Offender Alert) is an idiot.

Dr. Charles Darwin, please pick up the white courtesy phone.

Brian Stelter (Repeat Offender Alert) is a potato, and an idiot.

CNN’s David Zurawik is an idiot.

Robert Reich (Repeat Offender Alert) remains a sawed-off runt, and an idiot.

MSNBC’s C. Miller-Idriss is an idiot.

Biden deserves no respect, Juan, you idiot.

This Week’s Cultural Edification:

One of my favorite John Wayne movies for a number of reasons (at least one of which should be obvious) is the 1960 film North to Alaska, which also starred Stewart Granger and featured a great performance by Ernie Kovacs as Frankie Cannon, the slimy antagonist of the piece.  Check out the trailer:

One of the best bits of this film was the soundtrack, led off by Johnny Horton’s song of the same name, North to Alaska.  Here, then, is that song – enjoy!

Animal’s Daily Past is Prelude News

Before we begin, check out the first in a new series over at Glibertarians!

Now then:  Bob Riel’s Quest for the Presidency: The Storied and Surprising History of Presidential Campaigns in America presents an interesting picture of the history of Presidential elections and what the 2024 contest might look like.  Excerpt:

Among elections of more recent history, that of 1968 is likely the best-known. There was a Hollywood movie about it just last year, concerning the riots at the 1968 Democrat National Convention in Chicago. These protests showed how deeply divided the Democratic Party was over the Vietnam War; though the party nominated Vice President Hubert Humphrey, many Democrats opposed President Lyndon Johnson’s policies on Vietnam. But most readers will not know or remember that both parties saw tumultuous primary seasons that year, that Mitt Romney’s father ran in the Republican primary, or that controversial segregationist George Wallace ran as a third-party candidate, trying to outflank both GOP nominee Richard Nixon and Humphrey on issues such as civil rights and economics. Riel details how Wallace knew that he could not win but understood that if he could garner 10-15 percent of the popular vote nationally, he might deny either candidate a majority in the Electoral College. From there, the race would be decided by the House of Representatives, which could put Wallace in position to play kingmaker, since he would have congressional allies in the Southern state delegations. Wallace won only five states in the end, however, and failed to accomplish his goal.

Riel uses these stories to demonstrate how often political realignments happen through elections, such as the 1860 election that established the Republicans as a major party, or the 1932 election that helped enshrine the idea that the federal government had a duty to help people in need. Sometimes an election’s consequences don’t become apparent until years later. Barry Goldwater lost big in 1964, but 16 years later, Ronald Reagan won decisively on the platform that Goldwater had introduced.

Riel also stresses that the United States is going through a tumultuous political period. He recognizes that presidential elections will continue to be divisive and produce strong emotions on both sides, but the country has held elections through wars, riots, and economic collapse. Past elections can offer useful lessons as we grapple with today’s challenges.

While the article is interesting – and the book is now on my ‘to-read’ list – I’m not sure how predictive an analysis of previous elections, especially presidential elections, will prove to be in 2024.  Why?  Well, I’m a-gonna tell you.

First, we’re dealing with something new here:  A sitting President that is clearly and unarguably impaired, who nevertheless insists he will seek re-election.  There are good odds he’ll be removed from office for one reason or another before 2024, but his replacement will be a cackling imbecile whose approval ratings are about as high as syphilis.

We’re also dealing with an abrasive billionaire who managed to rock the political class back on its heels in 2016 who is likely to try to Grover Cleveland himself into another term.  While his first term was good for the economy, he faced brutal non-stop attacks from the legacy media and agents of the Democratic party (but I repeat myself) and while he promised to “drain the swamp,” the swamp seems to have survived his first four years just fine.

The field may well welcome a wild card in 2024.  In any case, this year’s mid-terms may give something of a preview.

 

Goodbye, Blue Monday

Goodbye, Blue Monday!

Thanks as always to The Other McCain, Pirate’s Cove, Whores and Ale, The Daley Gator and Bacon Time for the Rule Five links!

Over at PJ Media, Rabbi Michael Barclay had some interesting things to say about current affairs.  Excerpt:

A criminal is wrongfully killed, and “peaceful demonstrations,” which are actually violent riots, break out nationwide. The flag of a radical and violent group is placed next to the national flag on government buildings. Out of fear of being canceled and losing business, individuals and corporations succumb to publicly supporting this violent organization. Mandated behavior is compelled upon threat of arrest by the political elite and leadership. Despite objections from parents, schools begin teaching an alternative “history” and embrace prejudice, anti-Semitism, and sexual permissiveness as part of the school curriculum.

A President overreaches and takes on “emergency powers,” which create an authoritarian regime that demands supportive behavior and calls any criticism “disinformation.” A new agency of the government is created to “fight this disinformation”… an agency that even has access to armed personnel. This new agency is led by a fanatic who is arguably delusional in their own self-perception and fully committed to stopping the dissemination of any information that is not part of the authoritarian narrative. And through it all the media is a willing accomplice, even striking against other media outlets that try to present opposing views.

Sound like a brief recap of the recent past in this country?

The challenge is that this is actually a description of the development of the Nazi regime in Germany almost a century ago.

If this scares you, it should.

It’s been said that history may not always repeat, but it often rhymes.

Of course, there’s a reason that Godwin’s Law is a thing.  And the Left is far, far more prone to falling afoul of this than the Right; after any significant event in the political world, you can almost set your watch by the hysterical screech of “Nazi!” that follows.  But there’s a difference between the late Weimar Republic and our current situation today, and that can be summed up in one word:

Competence.

Say what you will about the Germans in the Nazi Party in the 1930s, but they weren’t stupid.  They knew what they wanted and they were willing to climb over piles of bodies to get there.  Whereas the current political Left in our country right now is about at the Keystone Kops level of ability.  Hell, for that matter, when you’re talking Congress, most of the Right is little better.

Our current political class is much more likely to stumble us into ruin that deliberately direct us there.  But when you consider the likely destination, how much difference does that make?

 

Deep thoughts, news of the day, totty and the Manly Arts.