Goodbye, Blue Monday

Goodbye, Blue Monday!

Thanks as always to The Daley Gator, The Other McCain, Pirate’s Cove, Whores and Ale and Bacon Time for the Rule Five links!

It was a great weekend here in the Great Land.  Yesterday (Sunday) was a bit rainy, but Saturday dawned fair, so I loaded the truck and went forthwith about seventy miles north to Denali State Park to look for some toothsome game birds.  I only found one, but that one bird fell to the first shot I have fired at game with the hand-made Henry Tolley side-by-side I bought a couple of years back.  The Tolley is a joy to carry; at a tad over six pounds it’s like carrying a toothbrush.  But even restricted as it is to low-pressure 2 1/2″ 12 gauge shells, it swatted this grouse right out of the air.

Sprucies are good eating.  With a bit of luck I’ll stuff some more in the freezer before winter settles in for good.

When winter does come in, I may get into the state land behind the house to look for some snowshoe hares.  Not only are they likewise good eating, Mrs. Animal expects some winter-white hare pelts for crafting purposes.

The longer we live in Alaska, the more we love it.

Rule Five Inflation Reduction Friday

Here, from Alex Epstein, is a great refutation of leftist claims about the misleadingly-named Inflation Reduction Act.  Read the whole thing, but here’s the first of twelve myths about that Act:

The Inflation Reduction Act is one of the worst energy policies in American history.

Its supporters are trying to hide this by spreading myth after myth about it being beneficial.

Here’s how to answer them.

  • Myth 1: The Inflation Reduction Act will lower the cost of energy.Truth: The Inflation Reduction Act will rapidly raise the cost of energy via
    • Policies that coerce us into using costly, unreliable “green” options
    • Policies that increase fossil fuel costs
    • More power for energy-obstructing bureaucrats and activists

The Inflation Reduction Act coerces grids and consumers into using costly, unreliable solar/wind electricity that they wouldn’t otherwise choose because it’s too expensive.

E.g., it indefinitely extends costly subsidies for unreliable solar/wind that defund and shut down reliable gas/coal plants.

  • At the same time the Inflation Reduction Act is promoting the shutdown of reliable electricity generation, it is—insanely—promoting far more use of electric cars via subsidies. California recently previewed the Inflation Reduction Act by telling citizens there wasn’t enough power for EVs even at 3% market penetration.1
  • The Inflation Reduction Act adds numerous taxes and restrictions on fossil fuels that will increase the cost of producing them.These include new or higher taxes on crude oil, on natural gas, on drilling on federal lands—all during an energy crisis where fossil fuels are desperately needed.2
  • Not only does the Inflation Reduction Act make energy more expensive by restricting fossil fuels directly, it does much more damage indirectly by giving much more money/power to anti-fossil-fuel bureaucrats and activists—who will eagerly restrict fossil fuel investment, production, and transport.
  • The Inflation Reduction Act gives anti-fossil-fuel bureaucrats/activists a new level of destructive power via language authorizing the Environmental Protection Agency to restrict any activity that emits CO2–which means anything the administration wants—under Section 115 of the Clean Air Act.3
  • The Inflation Reduction Act also gives anti-fossil-fuel bureaucrats/activists a new level of destructive power via $10s of billions for anti-fossil-fuel “environmental justice” causes.According to a WH-commissioned environmental justice report we must “sunset investment by 2030 in fossil fuels, plastics…and nuclear energy”!4
  • All claims that the Inflation Reduction Act will lower energy costs simply deny the obvious cost increases from:

    • Policies that coerce us into using costly, unreliable “green” options
    • Policies that increase fossil fuel costs
    • More power for energy-obstructing bureaucrats and activists.

Read it all.  Share widely.

This Act, it is apparent, is the back-door implementation of much of Alexandria Occasional Cortex’s “Green New Deal.”  It’s blatantly anti-nuke, anti-oil, anti-gas, anti-automobile, anti-American – you name it.  And the Democrats did this on purpose.

As I’ve always said, I’ll give the Dems credit for one thing:  When they get a chance to act, even with the narrowest of majorities, they take full advantage of it.  They squeezed this abomination through with the help of a few GOP turncoats, and they’ll do more if possible.  We already have one “diversity” Supreme Court pick, who seems to have been nominated and confirmed mostly for her plumbing, skin color and leftist politics – and hopefully that will be all the Supreme Court picks President Biden(‘s handlers) get.

But energy is a hot topic right now.  Gas prices are trending upward again.  The folks that provide us with heating oil have warned us of a significant increase this year.  Fortunately we have plenty of firewood.  Remember, also, that the price of fuel affects the price of everything else, and oh, by the way, the Imperial government wants you to give up your current vehicle for an expensive electric one.

Some days “fuck off, slaver” just doesn’t seem strong enough.  Hopefully in November we’ll turn enough of these bastards out to at least give us a reprieve – for a while.

Animal’s Daily Self-Discussing News

Mrs. Animal, our kids and grandkids, as well as many of my professional colleagues, are all fond of pointing out that I talk to myself.  I always reply that I find it the best way of being assured of intelligent conversation.

I do talk to myself; for me it’s a tool in the toolbox of thought processes.  As for the intelligent conversation:  Turns out I was right all along.  Excerpt:

Research suggests self-talk may help your brain perform better. A study published in Acta Psychologica asked participants to read instructions and then carry out the corresponding task. Some participants had to read their instructions silently, others out loud.

Researchers then measured concentration and task performance. Their results showed that reading aloud helped sustain concentration and enhance performance.

Mari-Beffa, one of the study’s authors, notes: “Talking out loud, when the mind is not wandering, could actually be a sign of high cognitive functioning. Rather than being mentally ill, it can make you intellectually more competent. The stereotype of the mad scientist talking to themselves, lost in their own inner world, might reflect the reality of a genius who uses all the means at their disposal to increase their brainpower.”

Additional research backs up those results. In one study, participants completed item-finding tasks faster when talking themselves through it, suggesting an improvement in visual processing. Others have observed children using self-talk to master complex tasks, such as tying shoelaces.

I found myself doing this just the other day, as I was removing the mower deck from the tractor in preparation for winter.  For me, though, it’s not normally task-related.  Sometimes it’s directed.  I tend to shout at the computer screen when some new outrage pisses me off.  Mrs. Animal, who shares our little office building with me during the day, has learned to ignore my outbursts.

So, sure, go ahead and externalize that internal dialogue.  Just be a little judicious about it.  Talking to yourself while in a crowded elevator, for example, may draw you some odd looks.

Animal’s Hump Day News

Happy Hump Day!

Food just keeps getting more expensive.  Here’s a tidbit from this story:

We asked CNN readers how inflation has impacted their eating habits, and many mentioned dining out less often, buying less meat and giving up splurges. Some said they are very worried about the future.

Food prices have spiked 11.4% over the past year, the largest annual increase since May 1979, according to data released in mid-September by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Grocery prices jumped 13.5% and restaurant menu prices increased 8% in that period.

Even burgers cost more these days.

Mrs. Animal and I are, through dint of hard work, still liquid enough to enjoy our traditional Saturday afternoon luncheon at a lodge up north of here.  But their prices have increased as well, maybe even more so, as everything here that can’t be grown locally has to come up by ship or rail.  Plenty of Alaskans grow much of their own food, supplemented with local fish and game.  But most urban Americans don’t have that option.

This is something that the GOP, if they aren’t stupid, should be hammering home until November.  But note that qualifier; you’ll rarely see a group of people so adept at seizing defeat from the jaws of victory.

With that said…

On To the Links!

People keep correcting President Biden because he’s senile and doesn’t know what he’s doing from one moment to the next.

What happens when Dems abandon a city to crime.

I’m just going to leave this here:

The economy was booming until Democrats took over.

If so, I predict massive non-compliance.

This guy gets it.

Honestly, California has been the butt of America’s jokes for a while now.

Who is really in charge in the Imperial City?

Probably not.

Could climate lockdowns be a thing?

The red wave may be a thing in Europe, too.

Don’t let the door hit you on the way out, Liz.

Yeah, we’ve known this for some time.

Mother Jones finds an acorn.

Probably because pollsters are blowing it again in 2022.

This Week’s Idiots:

The Nation’s Herman Schwartz is an idiot.

What’s left unsaid here is that these idiots are lying to their employers, which is grounds for immediate termination.

MSNBC’s “host and super-sleuth” Mehdi Hasan is an idiot.

MSNBC’s Dean Obeidallah (Repeat Offender Alert) is an idiot.

MSNBC’s Hayes Brown (Repeat Offender Alert) is an idiot.  And this makes it twice, in one week.  Clearly Hayes Brown is setting the standard for stupid.

MSNBC’s Joy Reid is an idiot.  (I’m sensing a pattern here.)

CNN’s Fredreka Schouten is an idiot.

Robert Reich (Repeat Offender Alert) is still a sawed-off runt, and an idiot.

Donna Brazile is an idiot.

Time’s Andrew Whitehead is an idiot.

Stupid NY vs. stupid NJ.

This Week’s Cultural Edification:

Thomas Dolby had a few interesting tunes in the early Eighties, and managed to make some fun music videos to go along with them.  My favorite bit of his work was She Blinded Me With Science, from the 1982 album The Golden Age of Wireless.  Interestingly, the video features one Magnus Alfred Pyke, OBE FRSE FRIC, as the “scientist” in the piece – and Mr. Pyke was actually a nutritional scientist and advisor to the UK government.  Pyke was criticized by some for ‘trivializing’ science by playing this role, but did it anyway.

It’s a fun song and a fun vid, anyway.  Enjoy.

Animal’s Daily Chicken Thief News

Before we start, check out my latest over at Glibertarians!

Now then:  This is one of the most Alaska stories you’re liable to find around:  A bear that attacked a father in son is not in fact the same bear that’s been raiding local chicken coops.  Excerpt:

A necropsy has been completed on the bear that attacked a 9-year-old boy and an adult male on Tuesday evening near Palmer.

The two were hunting in the Palmer Hay Flats area when they stumbled across a sow and her cub. Regional Management Coordinator for the Division of Wildlife Conservation Todd Rinaldi said Thursday that he believes the individuals surprised the bear.

“These were folks that were engaged in hunting activity which is usually a quiet activity,” Rinaldi said. “It becomes a really tricky situation to hunt animals in the bush while simultaneously making your presence known and not surprising animals like bears.”

According to Rinaldi, the pair tried to remove themselves from the situation upon encountering the animal, but the bear made threatening moves, causing the adult to fire his weapon. The carcass was discovered by Alaska State Troopers and Alaska Wildlife Troopers that same evening.

After numerous households experienced chicken coop raids in the last week, residents were left wondering if it was the same bear that had been showing up in the Butte, but department officials don’t believe that it is.

Bears, yes, can be an issue around here.  As previously noted, last spring we had a mature black hanging around the neighborhood for a while, and a neighbor (I didn’t see it myself) described it as a big one.  For a few days I carried a 12-gauge pump stuffed with 00 buckshot back and forth to the office and to keep an eye on things while Mrs. Animal worked in the greenhouse.  But we never saw this one ourselves.  If I’d have gotten a clear shot, he’d be in the freezer right now.

We’re pretty sure he moved on to the nearby Susitna River to see if he could do some fishing.

Bears can be dangerous, although here in the Great Land moose injure more people than bears.  Large, hairy critters in general can be dangerous, and our ever-more-urbanized population doesn’t always seem to realize that.

But that’s down in the 48, mostly, and when it happens up here it’s often tourists.  Folks who live up here tend to know how to deal with wildlife, although you do get some nitwits like that idiot Tim Treadwell dropping in now and then.  But then, what else are Darwin Awards for?

Goodbye, Blue Monday

Goodbye, Blue Monday!

Thanks as always to The Daley Gator, Pirate’s Cove, The Other McCain, Bacon Time and Whores and Ale for the Rule Five links!

By now you will all have seen this controversy – namely, the Canadian shop teacher who has taken to wearing grotesque fake breasts.  There’s been some pushback.  Excerpt:

Oakville Trafalgar High School is located in a nice, upscale neighborhood in a suburb of Toronto. It was a quiet little town where nothing important ever happened.

That is, until “Kayla Lemieux” — known as “Stephen Hanna” when he played a man last year — started the job of shop teacher at the school. It appears that Mr. Hanna’s transformation into Kayla Lemieux included a set of the most outrageous fake breasts available.

Naturally, the fake breasts — $1,000 online — are not serious medical prosthetics. There is no reason for Hanna/Lemieux to wear overtly sexual clothing — tight-fitting sweaters and shorts — except to attract the attention and sexually arouse the underage boys in Hanna/Lemieux’s classes.

So why does the Halton District School Board tolerate it?

Here’s the thing I think everyone is missing here; this nutjob, “Kayla Lemieux,” is doing this on purpose.

You might think I’m belaboring the obvious here – I mean, of course this person is doing this deliberately.  But – and granted I’m not too familiar with Canadian tort law – I wonder how much of this blatantly obvious publicity stunt is aimed at getting Lemieux fired, so he/she/it can claim aggrieved status and go after the school district legally, claiming discrimination.  I really think this person may be angling for a big payout, perhaps even thinking that the school district may make a handsome settlement to avoid a highly-publicized court case.  It wouldn’t be the first time something like this has happened.

I can’t think of any other reason, save for serious mental illness, that anyone would engage in such grotesquery.

Any of you True Believers out there familiar with the Canadian legal system?  Got any thoughts?

Rule Five Silent Majority Friday

Could pollsters be dramatically underestimating the right-of-center vote?  The Daily Wire’s John Rigolizzo has some thoughts.  Excerpts, with my comments, follow.

In a Twitter thread, Trafalgar Group chief pollster Robert C. Cahaly said that President Joe Biden’s recent attacks on so-called “MAGA Republicans” will make polling supporters of former President Donald Trump even harder to poll than in previous years. Cahaly pointed out that in the last two presidential election cycles, name-calling and threats from prominent Democrats contributed to the phenomenon of the “shy Trump voter.” But as the 2022 midterms have begun in earnest, Biden’s escalating rhetoric against Trump supporters, accusing them of embracing “semi-fascism” and being a threat to America, will make these voters even harder to reach in polling.

“In 2016 Trump supporters were called ‘Deplorables’ and other unflattering names,” Cahaly wrote on Twitter. “This was a major contributor to the ‘shy Trump voter’ phenomenon that ‘most’ polling missed which resulted in a major loss in public confidence for polling flowing the election.”

I’m not certain Mr. Rigolizzo is on the mark here – at least, not completely.  Characterizing these voters as “shy” may not be accurate.  While I can speak authoritatively only for myself, I can do that, and I can say that personally I don’t have any damn time for pollsters, and ever since Reagan was President I have routinely refused to speak to them, rhetoric about my views (or the Left’s caricatures of them) aside.  Frankly, I have better things to do with my time, and I include such better things as watching birds at the feeder or just looking out the window.

“I call this new group ‘submerged voters,’” Cahaly went on. “They aren’t putting stickers on their cars, signs in their yards, posting their opinions, or even answering polls. At this point I think it’s fair to say that Biden’s pursuit of and attacks on ‘MAGA Republicans’ has created an army of voters who will be virtually impossible to poll (even for us) and more difficult still to estimate.”

”The 2022 Republican turnout will likely be higher than any of the polls or models are showing,” he concluded. “All polls (including ours) will understate the impact of these ‘submerged voters.’”

Again, speaking only for myself:  I’ve never put signs in my yard nor bumper stickers on my truck.  In fact, I don’t mess up my vehicles with bumper stickers of any kind, for any reason, in concordance with Animal’s Law of Inverse Bumper Sticker Intelligence.  I have my own views on a variety of topics, and I feel no need to advertise them to my neighbors; instead, I put them here, where anyone can choose to read or not to read them, as suits them.

Here’s the onion:

Other independent pollsters endorsed Cahaly’s assessment.

“Yes, call them an enemy of the state one month, and next month participation [falls],” Big Data Poll director Richard Baris said in response to Cahaly’s comments. “And those who do claim to be ‘undecided’ across the board.”

“Voter demonization leads to devilish difficulties in surveying,” Rasmussen Reports replied, promoting Cahaly’s thread.

Now this is a cogent point.  I follow politics like lots of guys follow sports, and have done so since the Carter Administration.  I have never seen the level of vitriol from the Left as we have seen since 2015, and it seems to grow worse day by day.  We are beginning to see some small adoption of the same tactics by the Right, but for the most part the Right’s response has been in the form of actions; see the shipping if illegal immigrants to the various sanctuary jurisdictions, for example, where those illegals are not exactly welcomed with open arms.  That’s some epic-level trolling right there, and it’s exposing the hypocrisy of these left-dominated locales.

I’m old enough (barely) to remember Richard Nixon’s appeal to the “Silent Majority.”  President Trump, who will almost certainly be tossing his hat in the 2024 ring, is using the same phrase.  And this may well turn out to be the case, if Mr. Rigolizzo’s assertions are anywhere close to the mark.

But the key will be November.  The concealing of people’s views will end on Election Day, and then the Left will be able to see the bitter fruits of their demonization of political opponents.

We can hope, anyway.

Animal’s Daily Reparations News

Recently, in a discussion over the newly-minted King Charles III’s multi-billion dollar inheritance, British royal commentator Hillary Fordwich had some interesting remarks when CNN commenterdroid Don Lemon asked her about using some of that wealth for “reparations.”  Here, watch:

In case you don’t want to watch Don Lemon beclown himself in that video – I can’t blame you – here’s the text of her reply, from the story linked above:

Her response was epic. After initially giving the impression that she agreed with Lemon, she schooled him royally.

“Well, I think you’re right about reparations in terms of if people want it, though, what they need to do is you always need to go back to the beginning of a supply chain,” Fordwich replied. “Where was the beginning of the supply chain? That was in Africa, and when it crossed the entire world, when slavery was taking place, which was the first nation in the world that abolished slavery? The first nation world to abolish it, it was started by William Wilberforce, was the British. In Great Britain, they abolished slavery.”

She continued, “Two thousand naval men died on the high seas trying to stop slavery. Why? Because the African kings were rounding up their own people, they had them on cages waiting in the beaches. No one was running into Africa to get them. And I think you’re totally right.”

The look on Lemon’s face was priceless. Fordwich succeeded in agreeing with him, although for different reasons than he was obviously suggesting. And she wasn’t done with the lesson.

“If reparations need to be paid, we need to go right back to the beginning of that supply chain and say, ‘Who was rounding up their own people and having them handcuffed in cages?’ Absolutely. That’s where they should start. And maybe, I don’t know, the descendants of those families where they died at the, in the high seas trying to stop the slavery, that those families should receive something too, I think, at the same time.”

After she was done, Lemon sat there, stunned for several seconds, before responding, “It’s an interesting discussion, Hillary, Thank you very much, I appreciate it.”

In plain English – American style English, that is – Don Lemon just got his ass handed to him.  In thin slices.

In 1800, slavery was legal pretty much everywhere.  I’d like to think that it would have eventually been outlawed in the civilized world even if Great Britain had not led the way, but the fact is that they did, and the fact also is that a lot of African slaves were sold into slavery by their own people.  The fact also is that this is a practice than continues in sub-Saharan Africa to this day.

But that doesn’t fit The Narrative.  And shallow, weak thinkers like Don Lemon are all about The Narrative.  Once in a while, it’s nice to see that exposed.

 

Deep thoughts, news of the day, totty and the Manly Arts.