Animal’s Daily News

Scared_smallLouisiana Woman Forced Out of Apartment by Bats.  Bela Lugosi was unavailable for comment.  Excerpt:

Kiara Keasely, who was living in an apartment in the New Orleans suburb was basically forced out of her home when bats that had been living outside the building decided to move inside. She told WVUE, “I decided to move out, pack my stuff and move out because the exterminator wanted to open the vents to free the bats but I didn’t want them to be over my furniture so I moved everything out.”

An exterminator has removed more than 200 of the little guys from the apartment, and plans to release them outside of town, as is required by state law that mandates the bats not be killed. In the meantime, building owner Wendy Whitsett is working on preventing more from coming in.

The exterminator, a well-known bat expert.
The exterminator, a well-known bat expert.

She told the station, “We closed the windows, we sealed up the building wherever they had holes so they can’t come into the building. We caulked the whole building.”

Bats are normally pretty inoffensive little creatures who spend balmy summer nights gulping down millions of mosquitoes and other nasty insects.  On the other hand, they are a known rabies vector.  You really don’t want a few thousand of them bumming around your apartment, drinking your beer and eating all your Cheetos.

Facepalm-bearIn other sort-of science news:  Getting Shot in the Face is Bad.  I believe the appropriate response is “no shit, Sherlock.”  Excerpt:

Published this month in the Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, “Gunshot wounds and blast injuries to the face are associated with significant morbidity and mortality: Results of an 11-year multi-institutional study of 720 patients” brings scientific precision to the common-sense proposition that bullets to the face are really bad.

Well, at least that’s cleared up.

Animal’s Hump Day News

Happy Hump Day!
Happy Hump Day!

Halfway through an interminable week that will, on Friday, see yr. obdt. departing the frigid environs of the Upper Midwest for the warmer, sunnier home stomping grounds of Denver.  At least for a week.

Over at PJMedia is an article that echoes a concern I’ve had for some time:  Is It Over, and We Just Don’t Know It?  Excerpt:

Historians have a tough time agreeing on many of the turning points in ancient history.

One of them, in light of events during the past several years and the tone of President Barack Obama’s State of the Union address on January 28, seems particularly relevant. That’s the question of when the Roman Republic ended:

    (The republic) began with the overthrow of the Roman monarchy, c. 509 BC, and lasted over 450 years.

    * * * * * *

    Towards the end of the period a selection of Roman leaders came to so dominate the political arena that they exceeded the limitations of the Republic as a matter of course. Historians have variously proposed the appointment of Julius Caesar as perpetual dictator in 44 BC, the defeat of Mark Antony at the Battle of Actium in 31 BC, and the Roman Senate’s grant of extraordinary powers to Octavian (Augustus) under the first settlement in 27 BC, as candidates for the defining pivotal event ending the Republic.

There’s little doubt that the United States of America has reached a point where, relatively unhampered by legislative or judicial barriers, its president and his bureaucracy exceed the limits of the nation’s Constitution “as a matter of course.” They in turn are quietly but effectively under the control of our “independent” central bank.

Sad-BearDecades from now, it’s possible that historians will look back and conclude that the American experiment, which began with its declaration of independence from and defeat of Great Britain, ended sometime between 1999 and 2014. As with Rome, the pivotal event isn’t obvious, and the list which follows isn’t all-inclusive.

For several years now I’ve been saying that the parallels between the dying Roman Republic and the present situation in our own republic are a little too uncanny.

There seems to be one difference; what in Rome was largely done by individuals (Sulla, Caesar, Octavian) is in the United States being done by the governing bodies.  The House of Representatives, the Senate, the Supreme Court and several Presidents have all had a hand in the consolidation of power in Washington and the overrunning of the governing principles on which the Republic was founded, and which served its citizens for over two hundred years.

Is it too late to turn back?  Republics, when they fall, do not generally give rise to new republics.

Funnies

laughing_bearOnce in a while, we see a little good news:  Suicide Bomb Instructor Accidentally Detonates, Kills 21 Students in Iraq.  Heh heh heh.  Excerpt:

BAGHDAD (AP) — Insurgents accidentally set off their own car bomb Monday at a training camp in an orchard in a Sunni area north of Baghdad, leaving 21 dead and some two dozen arrested, Iraqi officials said.

…A police officer said the militants were attending a lesson on making car bombs and explosive belts when a glitch set off one of the devices.

Army slang for these gomers used to be “not-so-smart bombs.”  I guess these assholes were determined to live up to it.

One more; enjoy a Hardee’s/Carl’s Jr. ad that was deemed… inappropriate for broadcast.

I’m suddenly hungry.

Animal’s Looney Tuesday News

Derp BearThis came in over the transom today from an old friend who found the site, one Exopolitics.org, well, amusing.  The stories and excerpts are presented along with a series of images chosen by yr. obdt. to represent the intellectual depth and veracity of the stories very, very well.

First:  Did A UFO Doc With International Space Station for Alien Astronaut Meeting?  Excerpt:

On January 29, 2014 the live camera feed of the International Space Station (ISS) showed what appeared to be a strange yellow elliptical object docked with the hull of the ISS. The live camera feed was Jackassquickly recorded and uploaded to Youtube, and is generating much interest as possible evidence of a UFO interacting with the ISS. This has led to claims that the UFO was docked so that extraterrestrials could meet with NASA astronauts. The idea that alien ships could dock with the ISS and have meetings with its occupants is supported by the claims of a former NASA employee who during his 34 year service worked on numerous NASA missions and finally as a Space Craft Operator. He claims to have witnessed a similar alien rendezvous during a U.S. Space Shuttle mission just before his security clearance was revoked by NASA in 1992.

Froot LoopsOne hopes these visiting aliens have no ill intent.  Were they to prove hostile, though, we always have the option to send Will Smith and Jeff Goldblum to the ISS to hack the alien spaceship’s main computer with an old MacBook and make them self-destruct.

Right?

But wait!  There’s more!   More NASA Footage of UFO Docked At International Space Station.   Excerpt:

Yesterday the entire footage of what appears to be a UFO docked at the International Space State (ISS) was released and uploaded to Youtube. BoneheadThe video shows the sleek looking yellow UFO docked at the ISS for just over two minutes with the Earth slowly rotating in the background. The video ends with ISS live feed going into blue screen mode. This likely indicates that NASA cut the ISS live feed once it was realized that the video of the UFO docked at the ISS was going live to the world. The docking positioning of the UFO suggests that it is not the result of a camera anomaly but a genuine spacecraft of unknown origin.

The incident happened on January 29, 2014 and was transmitted by NASA’s live camera feed of the ISS which is made freely available on the internet to the general public on Ustream.

Well, it’s on the internet, and they have a video.  It must be true, right?

ScrewballRight?

It’s a wonder why so many people believe in weird things.  TV programming on things like ghosts, Bigfoot and UFOs are still popular.   And we live now in a time where almost everyone has a still and video camera instantly to hand, all the time, contained in their smart phone, and yet we still somehow seem to have no photos or videos of any of these oddities that are not obviously fake, blurry, barely recognizable as anything more than a lens flare or a dust bunny.

Smiling BearBut then, there are still people who believe in leprechauns, Bigfoot, fairies, and that Obamacare was a good idea.

(Insert obligatory “I, for one, welcome our new alien overlords” meme here.)

Goodbye, Blue Monday

Goodbye, Blue Monday
Goodbye, Blue Monday

The Colt .45s – Big and Heavy Worked, and Still Does.  Excerpt:

Think back to the days when America had two major handgun manufacturers: Colt and Smith & Wesson. Now consider this when speaking of their big-bore handguns: Smith & Wesson was identified more often with a .44 caliber, as in .44 Russian and .44 S&W Special, but for Colt it was .45’s. First came the .45 Colt in 1873 with a revised version in 1909. Then, beginning in the early 1900s, the company began toying with a rimless .45 for use in autoloading pistols. Of course that became the .45 ACP.

The operating characteristics of modern rifles and handguns where terminal impact are concerned are so different as to be differences not in degree but in kind.  Modern, high-velocity rifle cartridges – and by “modern” I mean any of the bottle-necked, smokeless powder cartridges beginning with the .30-40 US Army and the even more famous and durable Caliber .30, US, Model of 1906 – depend on high impact velocity, bullet deformation and hydrostatic shock to kill.   The high velocities obtainable with a rifle case means that the rifle bullet makes excellent use of the “V” in the basic physics equation E=MV2.  Pistol cartridges, even the modern versions cannot generate the velocities that rifle cartridges can, and so the M side of the equation becomes important.

That’s where the .45 gets its advantage.  After well over a hundred years, the stopping power of a big, heavy bullet hasn’t changed.  Many, many shooters still favor the .45, including yr. obdt,  being the owner of five .45 caliber pistols (RAA 1911, Glock 36, Glock 21, Ruger Vaquero, Smith & Wesson 25-5.)

colt1911_5357Even so, a handgun cartridge still pales in comparison to even a medium-power rifle cartridge, a distinction that many not familiar with firearms fail to understand.  By way of illustration, there’s an old story about an aged policeman who showed up for his retirement ceremony wearing his sidearm.  A lady in the group assembled for the celebration noted the holstered pistol and asked  him if he was expecting trouble.  “No ma’am,” he replied.  “If I was expecting trouble I’d have brought my rifle.”

Rule Five Friday

2014_02_07_Rule Five Friday (1)Let’s look at a few gun stories today – the first, from our own Colorado.    GOP Attempts to Repeal Colorado Background Checks Law.  Excerpt:

Colorado Republicans revived the most contentious debate of the last legislative session when they tried to repeal gun purchase background checks.

State Sen. George Rivera, the Republican who replaced Democrat Angela Giron when she was recalled from office because of her support of this and other new gun control laws, sponsored the bill.

Most of the testimony revolved around the question of whether or not the new law — which requires background checks not only for gun purchases at retail stores but also in private sales between individuals — will help reduce violent crime. A background check is also required if a gun is loaned to someone for more than 72 hours, such as for hunting, sport 2014_02_07_Rule Five Friday (2)shooting or safekeeping.

What’s interesting about that article and the controversy around it is found in this line:

Opponents of the repeal pointed to 104 instances of potential gun buyers failing background checks during attempted private transactions since the law went into effect on July 1. The reasons ranged from previous convictions for homicide to sexual assault.

Ok, then; one hundred and four people have committed a Federal felony, in attempting to illegally purchase a firearm.

Where are the arrests?  Where are the convictions?  Why did the gang of Mensa dropouts we call the Colorado Legislature pass this law, which obviously nobody intends to enforce?

2014_02_07_Rule Five Friday (3)One of the more idiotic provisions of this piece of legislative stupidity is the requirement to undergo a background check if you borrow a firearm from a neighbor or friend, say for a hunting trip.  This provision is utterly unenforceable and will be roundly ignored.  Combine this with the total ignoring of people who fail the background checks, and we are left with one question:  What the bloody hell was this law meant to actually accomplish?

While we’re on the subject of abject stupidity:  School Officials Deeply Troubled Over Guns Appearing ON SIGNS BANNING GUNS.  Excerpt:

Nolan stressed that she is very concerned with “safety and security” and concerned that, somehow, someone could wrongly interpret an image of a gun emblazoned with the universal sign for prohibiting something.

2014_02_07_Rule Five Friday (5)“I think the general public will be alarmed by it and wonder if people have been allowed to bring guns to school in the past,” Nolan also fretted.

She said she would prefer “something more subtle.”

“You can’t look at this (sticker) and not think about Sandy Hook,” the principal added.

Let’s be honest:  Principal Nolan is a hypersensitive nitwit.

One more, this one a piece of good news; the U.S. House of Representatives has passed the pro-sportsman SHARE Act.  Blind hogs and acorns, as they say.  Excerpt:

2014_02_07_Rule Five Friday (4)(The National Shooting Sports Foundation), along with a number of its partners, has been working closely with members of the House to ensure inclusion of a number of legislative priorities in the SHARE Act including provisions that will protect the use of traditional ammunition and fishing tackle by hunters and anglers, provide greater flexibility for states to utilize Pittman-Robertson funds to create and enhance public shooting ranges and facilitate greater access to Federal lands and waters for hunting, recreational fishing and shooting.

Of course, this legislation still has to get through the Senate in one form or another, and be approved by the President, who by all indications is no friend of the shooting sports.  But, as mentioned earlier – blind hogs and acorns.  We’ll see.

2014_02_07_Rule Five Friday (6)

Animal’s Science Thursday News

Science!Some tidbits from the wonderful world of science!

A Precursor to RNA?  Excerpt:

If RNA was indeed the first biological molecule, discovering how it first formed would illuminate the birth of life. The basic building blocks of RNA were available on prebiotic Earth, but chemists, including (Georgia Institute of Technology chemist Nicholas) Hud, have spent years trying to assemble them into an RNA molecule with little success. About 15 years ago, Hud grew frustrated with that search and decided to explore an alternative idea: Perhaps the first biological molecule was not RNA, but a precursor that possessed similar characteristics and could more easily assemble itself from prebiotic ingredients. Perhaps RNA evolved from this more ancient molecule, just as DNA evolved from RNA.

What’s interesting about this?  We really don’t know much about how life came to be on Earth.  We know quite a lot about what happened once there was life, but the study of life’s origins – abiogenesis – is still working out the basic details.  This may be a step towards a better understanding, maybe even a hypothesis.

Mating With Neandertals Was Hard.  I’ll forgo the obvious joke.  Excerpt:

Uncle.
Uncle.

While past studies have suggested that interbreeding improved immunity and genetics related to disease resistance, it turns out that Neanderthals might have actually passed along some harmful genes, as well.  Studies suggested that genes associated with increased risk of lupus, biliary cirrhosis, Crohn’s disease, and smoking addiction were all inherited from the Neanderthals.

Whoops.  While it’s interesting to know that there are traces of these hardy, resilient humans left, we could probably do without the disease aspects.

One more, this one presenting the possibility of a revolutionary material:  Lighter Than Water, Stronger Than Steel.   Excerpt:

Materials shape human progress – think stone age or bronze age. The 21st century has been referred to as the molecular age, a time when scientists are beginning to manipulate materials at the atomic level to create new substances with astounding properties.

Taking a step in that direction, Jens Bauer at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and his colleagues have developed a bone-like material that is less dense than water, but as strong as some forms of steel. “This is the first experimental proof that such materials can exist,” Bauer said.

Hank Rearden could not be reached for comment.

On that note, we return you to your Thursday, already in progress.

Animal’s Hump Day News

Happy Hump Day!
Happy Hump Day!

This just in from the always-worth-reading Dr. Victor Davis Hanson:  A Beat-up, Exhausted, and Terrified Republican Establishment.  Excerpt:

On almost every contemporary issue there is a populist, middle-class argument to be made against elite liberalism. Yet the Republican class in charge seems ossified in its inability to make a counter-argument for the middle class. Never has the liberal agenda been so vulnerable, a logical development when bad ideas have had five years to prove themselves as very bad ideas. When Obama is all done he will have taken high presidential popularity ratings, a supermajority in the Senate, and a large margin in the House and lost them all — if only the Republicans can make an adequate case that they represent the middle class, the Democrats only the very wealthy and the very dependent.

The thing is this:  I’m not all that sure that the Republicans really do represent the middle class any more.  I’m not sure anyone does.  The Democrats sure as hell don’t; they represent an odd coalition ranging from radical environmentalists, the Occupy Wall Street nutbars, and the San Francisco latte socialists to labor-union activists and a few last old Truman blue-collar Democrats.  The GOP struggles to gather in what someone a few years back called the “Sam’s Club” Republicans – the small business, entrepreneur folks, the people that drive real economic growth.  But they aren’t doing a very good job of that, either.

Dual-BearsA big part of the GOP’s problem is their failure to adjust to a generational shift in attitudes.  The up-and-coming generation is open to the Republican’s low-tax, small government message, but is resistant to the party’s social wing, which insists on government interference into other aspects of people’s lives.

It’s a pretty problem, and one that neither party seems to be able to wrap their brains around.  Whichever one does first – and the GOP seems to hold an edge on the growing libertarian population – will have a majority advantage for some time to come.

Deep thoughts, news of the day, totty and the Manly Arts.