Category Archives: News

My thoughts on the news of the day, both local, Colorado, national and international.

Animal’s Hump Day News

Happy Hump Day!

Things just keep getting more interesting.  The Imperial City has announced that Imperial coronavirus social isolation standards will be extended until April 30th.  Since I can work remote, and since I’m in the medical manufacturing industry, this won’t affect me all that much, aside from (obviously) not being around people as much.  That isolation, of course, does not include my own dear Mrs. Animal, and to my very great fortune, our marriage is such that we are very comfortable being isolated together.

In fact, there are some distinct benefits to this arrangement.

Anyway…

On To the Links!

I love a happy ending.

This in Monday’s New York Post:  Dems need to bench Biden.  No shit.

Speaking of Groper Joe:  He has more problems besides creeping dementia.

Oil prices continue to drop.  Cheap energy is good, but low oil prices are hard on American fracking companies.

“In our pluralistic society we generally try to accommodate how individuals desire to live their lives up to the point where those desires impinge on the other people’s rights,” said Attorney General William P. Barr. “Allowing biological males to compete in all-female sports deprives women of the opportunity to participate fully and fairly in sports and is fundamentally unfair to female athletes.”  About damn time.

Kennedy Center:  Received $25 handout from Queen Nancy.  Kennedy Center to musicians:  Fuck off, you’re fired!

Promising (and in long use) medicine for Kung Flu approved.

Yeah, good luck with that.

Ventilator shortages, it turns out, are nothing new.

Duck!

Duck!

Goose!

Fines and jail for leaving your house without permission.  Because fuck the First Amendment.

Big Brother is watching.  Because fuck the Fourth Amendment.

This Week’s Idiots:

Kathy Griffin is an idiot.

Queen Nancy Pelosi is an idiot.

The legacy media is full of idiots.

Rachel Maddow is an idiot.

China’s wet markets, the probable source of the Kung Flu, are back in business.  Idiots.

With That Said:

Moving soon into Week Three of our self-imposed isolation.

This whole thing is getting a little surreal.  Monday’s announcement has us sorely tempted to negotiate an end to our New Jersey lease and head on home to Colorado for good, since I’m working remote anyway, but the place that sells the luggage trailer we need for the trip is closed, and from what I hear many of the roadside motels we’d need for the trip are closed as well.  So, for the time being, we’re planning to stick it out until the end of May, and see which way the fox jumps.

Anyway, here’ s a Hump Day bonus to cheer us all up.

And so with that, we return you to your Wednesday, already in progress.

Goodbye, Blue Monday

Goodbye, Blue Monday!

Thanks as always to The Other McCain and Pirate’s Cove for the Rule Five links!

This piece on 5 Major Paradigm Shifts The Wuhan Flu Crisis Has Revealed Americans Need came out late last week, but I didn’t have time to digest it until the weekend.  Here are the two things I found most interesting, with my comments:

When the Wuhan coronavirus pandemic arose and began spreading, for weeks the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) sought to cover it up, with deadly consequences for the world. When communist China was blamed, it not only refused to take responsibility, but slandered America for pointing the finger, to the point of calling the United States culpable as part of a disinformation campaign.

The CCP even threatened, via a state-backed publication, to cut off essential medical supplies should Americans continue speaking openly and honestly about the CCP’s role in creating the crisis. Then the CCP cynically tried to act as a savior for the crisis it created.

Every day this pandemic persists, and long after it is neutralized, we must remember the CCP bears by far the greatest responsibility of any party for this pandemic. If the CCP is not made to pay in a meaningful sense for the global catastrophe it caused, it will continue to act with impunity in its quest for hegemony, guaranteed.

This pandemic should represent the most tangible sign yet for all of America that we must decouple from communist China in every strategically significant sector. We cannot put our survival in the hands of a hostile adversary.

President Trump’s 2016 campaign was focused in large part on bringing our manufacturing sector back home.  While I’m not a fan of government at any level mandating how businesses run, I do see plenty of talk now about how big companies are re-thinking their supply chains in light of what is happening right now.  And, frankly, that’s the smart thing to do.  Keeping the supply chains closer would lessen the impact of the recurrence of this kind of event.

Then there’s this:

While a society-wide shutdown certainly represents the most extreme kind of financial shock, nevertheless, the devastating impact of the Chinese coronavirus pandemic accentuates the problem of our largely debt-based economy in both the public and private spheres.

At the governmental level, the fact that we are likely to completely blow out budgets that were already so bloated as to ensure interest payments on the national debt would soon swamp all spending besides entitlements shows the extent of our profligacy and misplaced confidence we can debt-finance the U.S. government forever. There appears to be zero national will to deal with runaway spending and the runaway deficits and debt it creates.

But the reality is that in the next major crisis, we will be in an even worse financial position. What will happen if multitrillion-dollar relief bills are simply not tenable at that point?

What the hell?  What do you mean at that point?  It’s not tenable now!

The national debt is already past the point of no return.  The Kung Flu pandemic has lots of folks out of work and many more worried about money, and I can understand the pressure pols feel to do something.  But what they are doing is throwing money at the problem, and the only thing that is staving off inflation is the Fed keeping interest rates at near zero, which discourages saving and drives people into equity markets, which looks good on paper but is likewise inflated beyond any actual worth…

A big part of our national economy is a house of cards.  We still have companies that make things, and we still have a fairly decent business environment; but if that house of cards collapses, it’s going to bring plenty of otherwise-sound enterprises with it.

If that happens, forget viral pandemics.  We’ll have bigger problems.

Rule Five Warmer Weather Friday

There has been a fair amount of talk about how warm weather will reduce the Kung Flu virus, as it routinely does the flu virii.  But Smithsonian’s Dr. Katherine Wu is skeptical.  Excerpt:

COVID-19 is not the flu. But amidst the ongoing pandemic, many people hold out hope that the two diseases have something crucial in common: a seasonality that will loosen the global grip of SARS-CoV-2 as the weather warms.

Many infectious diseases wax and wane with the changing months. Some, like flu, spike when the weather turns cold, while others, like cholera, thrive during warm, rainy summers. Whether such a pattern applies to SARS-CoV-2 is unclear. With spring just barely sprung, scientists haven’t had the time to suss out SARS-CoV-2’s annual schedule—if it sticks to one at all.

Besides, relying on seasonality to curb a pandemic can be a dangerous line of thought, says C. Brandon Ogbunu, a computational epidemiologist at Brown University.

“Seasonality has the potential to decrease the rate of infection,” he says. But this factor alone won’t get the world anywhere close to resolving the outbreak. “If I was a betting person … all [my money] would be on the impact of human behavior and infrastructure” to slow transmission, he adds. “That’s where we need to put our emphasis.”

Why Are Diseases Seasonal, Anyway?

The first time a severe infectious disease tears through a new population, it’s sure to wreak havoc. Without previous exposure, no members of the community are immune, leaving the virus with numerous potential hosts to sustain it for months to come, regardless of the weather forecast.

Columbia University epidemiologist Micaela Martinez compares early outbreaks to a fire igniting in a forest full of kindling. The occasional rainstorm might do a bit to slow the conflagration. But with so many vulnerable trees, a touch of precipitation would be nowhere near enough to snuff out the flames. “For the first wave, the seasonality is not as relevant,” she says. “We can’t expect [the virus] to just go away.”

And that’s the rub.

Here’s another take on this from Dr. Marc Lipsitch, a Professor of Epidemiology and Director, Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health:

For the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, we have reason to expect that like other betacoronaviruses, it may transmit somewhat more efficiently in winter than summer, though we don’t know the mechanism(s) responsible. The size of the change is expected to be modest, and not enough to stop transmission on its own.  Based on the analogy of pandemic flu, we expect that SARS-CoV-2, as a virus new to humans, will face less immunity and thus transmit more readily even outside of the winter season. Changing seasons and school vacation may help, but are unlikely to stop transmission. Urgent for effective policy is to determine if children are important transmitters, in which case school closures may help slow transmission, or not, in which case resources would be wasted in such closures. Previously it was thought children were not easily infected with SARS-CoV-2. Recent evidence from Shenzhen suggests that children may be infected and shed detectable virus at about the same rate as adults — so now the only question is whether they transmit as readily. It seems likely the answer is yes, but no data as of this writing to my knowledge.

In other words:  “We don’t really know, but I’m not optimistic.”

I’m kind of hoping summer brings some relief from this thing, at least enough to let life return to some semblance of normalcy.  Opening restaurants and such would be good start; I’d also like if if our gun club’s trap stands opened back up again.

But while this isn’t my particular field of biology, I do know that we’re dealing with a new pathogen in a population that’s largely lacking any immunity.  This may drag on for a while; a vaccine would be great but that’s months off.  There are hopeful developments on the treatment front, but that doesn’t prevent transmission.

What the experts cited above don’t say is what is obvious to many of us:  We’ll have to wait and see.

Animal’s Hump Day News

Happy Hump Day!

Week Two of our own self-isolation is under way.  Down side of this trip home:  The club house and trap stands at the gun club are closed, so no clay birds this trip.

With that said…

On To the Links!

RIP, Kenny Rogers.  I had the pleasure of meeting Mr. Rogers once, along about 1990.  Nice man – very down to earth, open, friendly, and very, very conscious of the people that made him the star he was.

Apparently some nutbars are claiming the COVID-19 virus came from space.  Those people really belong in This Week’s Idiots, below, but this article is debunking that claim.

Denver’s own Mike Rosen on the coronavirus.

The President on the coronavirus.

Italy may have turned the corner.

On the other hand, the UK has no First Amendment.

The Saudis and the Russians seem to be engaging in an oil price war.  Well, cheap energy is always good, but this will be hard on American oil companies.

The House of Representatives is condemning the actions of China in this pandemic crisis, and for other things.  The Chinese Communist Party gives not even one single shit.

This Week’s Idiots:

Princess Spreading Bull Warren is an idiot.

Jake Tapper is an idiot.

These people are idiots.

This guy was an idiot.  Paging Dr. Darwin, Dr. Charles Darwin!  Of course, the legacy media covering this are also idiots.

This New York imam is an idiot.

And So…

Our self-imposed national isolation is close to entering Week 3.  My current project has all office personnel, including consultants, working from home.  Mrs. Animal and I are still planning to return to our temporary New Jersey digs on Sunday, mostly because we don’t have another flight to CO scheduled until later April, and I’d prefer to be on hand in case the isolation ends sooner than expected.

But honestly, I don’t see this thing ending before the end of April.  It may well drag on later.  But when it does end, I expect the economy will come back with a roar; pent-up demand is a thing, after all.

So, to cheer us all up with the promise of sunnier things to come, here’s something from the archives:

With that, we return you to your socially distanced Wednesday, already in progress.

Animal’s Daily TP News

Be sure to catch the latest in my Gold Standards series over at Glibertarians.  This week:  The .30-06!

The ongoing coronavirus freakout/pants-shitting has inexplicably encompassed water and toilet paper.  Excerpt:

OK, I can understand face masks and hand sanitisers walking off the shelves, as these are the crucial tools in containing the spread of the pandemic. Most face masks – as with so many other products in our shops – are made in China and in the current crisis conditions any new and additional supplies won’t make it out of the country, so whatever is already here is it. And it isn’t, as masks have been the first item to disappear from retail outlets from your local pharmacy to a Bunnings store.

I can also understand the non-perishable food supplies. Even though Australia could be quite self-sufficient if need be (minus the out of season imported fruit and veg), possibly people are stocking up not so much in fear the food will run out but out of reluctance to go out in the public in a few weeks’ time should the situation really turn into a zombie apocalypse. In any case, there is nothing wrong with having a well stocked pantry.

Where I start to no longer understand the consumers is bottled water. We are fortunate to live in a developed country where one can safely drink from a tap. There won’t be shortages of drinkable water under any circumstances – except for a complete societal collapse – and coronavirus is not a water-borne pathogen like those causing cholera or typhoid. If you are still paranoid, you can boil your water before ingesting (just make sure you cool it down).

Look, there are reasonable precautions, and there are unreasonable precautions, then there are ridiculous paranoias.  The hoarding of bottled water and toilet paper is somewhere between the latter two of these, leaning sharply towards “paranoia.”

This is a virus, not a hurricane or earthquake.  The power and water are going to stay on.  Stores will be restocked.  It’s just freaking idiotic to think that you won’t be able to get toilet paper a month from now.  A week from now may be problematic – but only because of precisely this kind of paranoid stupidity from the idiots who are stocking up with entire cartloads of bottled water and toilet paper.

The linked article includes this gem:

Water.

Personally, of course, what I find the most ironic about the current situation are the memories it brings back of growing up in communist Poland, when in the early to mid-1980s you really had to queue up for toilet paper (or “srajtasma” as it was colloquially known – a shit tape), mostly unsuccessfully, because of the endemic shortages, unless you “knew people”, which my father fortunately did and so we never lacked in the basic sandpaper-grade, deep grey-shaded, uneven shaped rolls that in truth looked like slightly wider (and depressing) versions of party streamers. The fact that the socialist government couldn’t even provide the workers in their paradise with something as basic as toilet paper has since then become both a historical joke as well as a serious emblem of the failings of planned economy where, as the saying goes, everything is planned except for the economy, as this nostalgia-inducing archival news story from 1984 (!) reports:

For once President Reagan was not blamed by communist authorities for the latest woe facing Poles — an official shortage of toilet paper.

Poles have been promised an extra roll this year to meet demand.

Yes, socialists and communists always fuck up supply.  But we aren’t (yet) a socialist country.  Stocks will be replenished, and probably pretty quickly.  Relax, folks.  Have a drink (something that will calm you down; not necessarily water.)  Calm down.  This too shall pass.

Goodbye, Blue Monday

Goodbye, Blue Monday!

Thanks as always to The Other McCain and Pirate’s Cove for the Rule Five links!

Meanwhile, the pants-shitting over COVID-19 continues, all out of proportion; The New Criterion‘s Heather Mac Donald tells us why.  Excerpt:

The number of cases in most afflicted countries is paltry. As of today, 127 countries had reported some cases, but forty-eight of those countries had fewer than ten cases, according to Worldometer. At this point, more people have recovered from the virus than are still sick. But the damage to people’s livelihoods through the resulting economic contraction is real and widespread. Its health consequences will be more severe than those of the coronavirus, as Steve Malanga shows in City Journal. The people who can least afford to lose jobs will be the hardest hit by the assault on tourism. Small entrepreneurs, whether in manufacturing or the service sector, will struggle to stay afloat. Such unjustified, unpredicted economic havoc undermines government legitimacy.

President Trump has been criticized for not being apocalyptic enough in his press conferences. In fact, he should be even more skeptical of the panic than he has been. He should relentlessly put the coronavirus risk into context with opioid deaths, homicide deaths—about sixteen thousand a year in the United States—flu deaths, and traffic deaths. One might have thought New York governor Andrew Cuomo a voice of reason when, a few days ago, he tried to tamp down the hysteria in a press conference, saying: “This is not Ebola, this is not sars, this is not some science fiction movie come to life. The hysteria here is way out of line with the actuality and the facts.” And yet since then he called a state of emergency in New York, and he and Mayor Bill de Blasio have all but shut down the New York City economy. They, like most all U.S. politicians nowadays, have shown an overwhelming impulse to be irrationally risk-averse.

Rather than indiscriminately shutting down public events and travel, we should target prevention where it is most needed: in nursing homes and hospitals.

And now we see why toilet paper and bottle water have been flying off the shelves.

Critical Shortages.

There really has been very little discussion of the actual, comparative scope of the coronavirus issue.  For one thing, the very use of the term “coronavirus” seems new and scary to people not familiar with viruses; some 10-15% of the upper RI issues we call “the common cold” are caused by coronaviruses.  It is, after all, a type of virus, not a specific virus; the COVID-19 is just one member of that family.

The primary message from all levels of government should simply be “observe the same precautions you observe every cold and flu season.  This, too, shall pass.”

But no.  It’s all to panic time.

Rule Five Job Killer Friday

Mrs. Animal and I live in Arapahoe County, Colorado; our county assessor is one PK Kaiser, who was formerly a member of the Colorado Democratic Party State Central & Executive Committees.  So, Kaiser is a committed, partisan Democrat, which makes these comments on the 2020 election interesting.  Excerpts, with my comments:

Senator Bernie Sanders promised to ban fracking. So did Senator Elizabeth Warren, who yesterday suspended her presidential campaign. Senator Joe Biden, the frontrunner, does not support banning fracking, but says that we need to transition away from it. Every candidate offered some plan to limit domestic energy production. While these positions might appeal to environmentalists, they won’t win over the swing state voters who rely on America’s oil and natural gas industry for affordable energy and good jobs.

It’s important to note that one of these swing states, Pennsylvania, is considered a must-win if the Democrats are to take the White House this fall.

The natural gas and oil industry supports more than 10 million high-paying jobs across the nation. Many of these jobs are located in swing states like Pennsylvania, Florida, and Michigan, all of which Democrats lost in 2016. The industry supports more than 12 percent of jobs in Texas, another key state Democrats want to carry in 2020.

Florida, of course, is another of these must-win swing states.

The industry is projected to support an additional 1.9 million American jobs by 2035. Nearly 60 percent of those positions will go to blue-collar workers, a group that supported President Trump in 2016. Pledging to destroy blue collar jobs won’t help Democrats win back this demographic.

Nor would the fact that banning fossil fuels will raise Americans’ energy bills. Recent advancements in fracking allowed U.S. energy firms to access previously untapped natural gas reserves. Thanks in part to this abundance of energy, the cost of heating a home with natural gas fell 12 percent between 2005 and 2010. That’s more than $300 a year in savings.

It’s not just the abundance of cheap, clean energy; it’s also our reduced (if not eliminated) dependence on foreign sources of energy.  The U.S. is now a net energy exporter, and it’s in our interest to keep it that way.

Fracking bans and other Democratic plans would undo this progress. Eliminating fossil fuels from the power sector would cost the average American household $2,000 a year in added energy costs, according to one study.

In other words, it would make our nation darker, colder, and less healthy.

Contrary to what Democrats claim, this domestic energy boom has also done wonders for the environment. Thanks to the availability of cheap natural gas, energy firms have transitioned away from coal, which emits nearly twice as much carbon dioxide. Natural gas has done more to reduce carbon dioxide emissions than renewables since 2005, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Today, U.S. emissions are nearing 30-year lows even as global emissions have risen 50 percent.

And here’s the real onion:

Clearly, Democrats think that demonizing the oil and natural gas industry is a winning strategy. The polls suggest otherwise.

In 2016, two-thirds of voters said they were more likely to vote for a candidate who supports increasing the production of oil and natural gas. And less than half of swing voters in the “Blue Wall” — Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota — support a fracking ban.

Democrats failed to attract swing state voters in 2016, and it cost them the election. Given candidates’ opposition to fossil fuels, they seem bound to repeat themselves in 2020.

But let’s examine this conflict from a strategic viewpoint on the part of these candidates.

It’s a well-known fact in Presidential elections that Democrat candidates have to tack left to win the nomination, and then move towards the center to win the general.  The opposite applies to Republicans.  Now, the daffy old Bolshevik from Vermont won’t do this, assuming (as now does not seem likely) he wins the nomination.  He’s structurally incapable of doing so, partly because he’s an ideologue, and partly because, to give credit where credit is due, he’s actually sincere – he really believes all the daffy ideas he propounds.  As for Groper Joe, he’ll try to tack back in the general, but he’s on record now.  President Trump, who is no polite, collegial type like past GOP candidates, will staple Biden’s previous anti-energy statements to his forehead.

And Groper Joe will stagger and stumble while trying to explain himself.

The Democrats have done this to themselves.  If they want to win the 2024 election, I’d recommend a good hard look in the mirror first.

 

 

Animal’s Hump Day News

Happy Hump Day!

Another week east of the Mississippi, which isn’t my preferred area of operations; but needs must when you have a mortgage to pay.  We were thinking of going to a massive gun show down towards Philadelphia this Saturday, but at the moment spending a day wandering a crowded venue with 3-4,000 random strangers just doesn’t seem like the greatest idea.  At least we can lose ourselves drinking from that fire hose of information that is The Intarwebz.  And so:

On To the Links!

Colorado’s own John Caldera:  The initiative process in Colorado could be a dual-edged sword.

Brain-eating songbirds.  Yes, really.

What happened to Lieawatha Warren?  Well, she was a terrible candidate:  Shrill, hectoring, and pushing horrible policies.

The more I read about Dan Crenshaw, the more I like him.

Welcome to Armageddon.  No, it has nothing to do with the Coronavirus.

This is why idiots think that billionaires can pay for everything.

I’m not saying it’s aliens…

What a stupid idea.

This Week’s Idiots:

MSNBC host Brian Williams and New York Times Editorial Board Member Mara Gay are both idiots.

Chuck Schumer is an arrogant prick, and an idiot.

Rachel Maddow is an idiot.

Jim Bakker:  Still an idiot after all these years.

Paul Krugman is an unprincipled hack, and an idiot.

The New York Times editorial board is populated by idiots.

And so…

We’re still adjusting to the dark mornings and increased light in the evenings.  I’m not a fan of the first part, although I rather like the last.  I like it well enough, in fact, to think it a good idea year-round; which begs the question, why the hell are we still doing the Daylight Savings bullshit?  Pick a time and stick with it, already!

But at least it’s a sign that summer is coming.

I love Japan.

And on that sunny note, we return you to your Wednesday, already in progress.

Animal’s Hump Day News

Sunday saw us flying on the Friendly Skies back to our temporary lodgings in New Jersey, where we still will maintain this second household until the end of May.  And yes, it still sucks here, despite some really great Italian restaurants in the area.  But, I still have a mortgage to pay, so we soldier on.

With that said, it’s…

On To the Links!

The “gun show loophole” is bullshit.  Tell us something we didn’t already know.

The U.S. has signed a preliminary peace deal with the Taliban.  I’m wondering how well this will work, but upside, we get a lot of our folks out of a third world shithole that we’ll never, ever be able to reform.  And, to be fair, you don’t make peace deals with your friends, you make them with your enemies.

Turns out that on Castro, as on so many other topics, the daffy old Bolshevik from Vermont is full of shit.  Health care, too.

On the Coronavirus:  Don’t panic.  Don’t buy into wacko conspiracy theories.  Seriously, folks, exercise a little common sense and everything will be fine.  Wash your hands.  Avoid traveling to Wuhan.  That sort of thing.

Protein found in a meteorite!  This is a first.  What does it mean?  Who knows?  That’s part of what makes it interesting.

No.  It’s just lousy beer.  Seriously, this is what we call “sex in a canoe.”

Her Imperial Majesty Hillary I, Dowager Empress of Chappaqua, is getting deposed on her email shenanigans.

This Week’s Idiots:

Pete Davidson is an idiot.

Joe Biden is an idiot, and possibly senile.

Lieawatha Warren is an idiot.

And now…

I’m drawing a bit of a blank on witty commentary this morning, so here’s a bit of totty from the archives instead:

And on that sunny note, we return you to your Wednesday, already in progress.

Animal’s Daily Nanny Bloomberg News

John Stossel weighs in on why Nanny Bloomberg is on the long list of people who shouldn’t be President.  Excerpt:

Like his fellow New York billionaire Donald Trump, he’s used to getting his own way at his own company.

Unfortunately, he assumes government should function in a similar fashion.

Instead of a predictable governing philosophy, Bloomberg has whims — lots of them.

The Media Research Center’s Craig Bannister tallied “32 Bloomberg Bans” (some were overturned).

While he was mayor of New York City, Bloomberg targeted smoking, flavored tobacco products, fattening sodas, cars on certain Manhattan streets, loud music, grass clippings, cellphones in schools, salt, guns, Styrofoam, restaurant menus without calorie counts and restaurants without extra bathrooms for women.

When challenged about how his ban on big soft drinks inconvenienced consumers, Bloomberg contemptuously replied that you could always buy two smaller containers.

“Could be that it’s a little less convenient to have to carry two 16-ounce drinks to your seat(, but) I don’t think you can make the case that we’re taking things away.”

Now, Nanny Bloomberg is an elitist prick.  For evidence of that, one need look no farther than his insistence that “ordinary” citizens shouldn’t have guns, while surrounding himself with armed guards, because, of course, Top Men aren’t subject to the same restrictions that the plebs must live under – at least in Nanny’s mind.

But here’s where I part ways with Mr. Stossel and his mustache:

If Bloomberg ends up in the White House, he’d bring his nanny approach to the whole planet.

Still, in my state’s primary, I’ll vote for him over Bernie Sanders.

I’d vote for my daughter’s cat over Bernie Sanders.  But I’m wondering why Mr. Stossel is voting in a Democratic primary at all?

I’m not too sure about in what state Mr. Stossel hangs his hat.  Some states have open primaries, in which one can cross party lines and vote for the worst candidate in the party you hate more, and it’s hard to imagine a worse candidate than the daffy old Bolshevik from Vermont.  In that case, I’d enthusiastically vote for Bernie, because he’s the most horrible of a list of horrible people and I don’t want any of them to be President.  (And to be fair, I’ve long thought that anyone who actually wants to be President should automatically be disqualified.)

And if John is in a closed-primary state, as Colorado has reverted to, then this would mean he’s a registered Democrat, which is a little baffling for a libertarian.

But to come back around to Nanny Bloomberg; John nails it in his closing sentences:

Bloomberg, unfortunately, is yet another unprincipled power-hungry political egomaniac.

I think Nanny Bloomberg has given enough orders for one lifetime.

Amen and amen.