Category Archives: Manly Arts

Animal’s Daily Big-Bore News

A cartridge that is overkill in a handgun is perfectly manageable in a rifle, even a carbine; that brings us to the Ruger Gunsite Scout in .450 Bushmaster.  Excerpt:

The .450 Bushmaster is one of three “thumper” rounds most commonly chambered in the AR-15 platform (the .458 SOCOM and the .50 Beowulf complete the trio). The quest for the perfect AR-15 cartridge is ongoing, but that hasn’t stopped manufacturers from implementing these powerful rounds in other platforms.

Ruger currently offers two models chambered in .450 Bushmaster: an iteration of their American Ranch series and the one I tested, the Gunsite Scout.

If you’re unfamiliar with the .450 Bushmaster, you’re not alone. It’s a relatively new cartridge, and not many companies manufacture the round or produce rifles that fire it. But as hog hunting grows in popularity, the .450 Bushmaster is well-positioned to grow right along with it.

I’ve been intrigued by the Ruger Scout concept for quite a while, and have been thinking of picking up one in .308.   But the idea of the thumpin’ .450 Bushmaster kicks my curiosity up a notch.

I can not, however, agree with the tag line of the article: If You Could Only Own One Rifle.  In the first place, I can’t see owning only one rifle, but I’m an inveterate pack rat, and could easily see how someone who would prefer to have a gun for all seasons – the Old Man harbors those sorts of tendencies.  But were I limited to one rifle, I’d happily hang on to my own Thunder Speaker; the .338 Win Mag is an order of magnitude more powerful than the .450 Bushmaster, and Thunder Speaker has killed game at greater ranges than the .450 will easily handle.

Thunder Speaker and a Colorado mulie, taken at 280 long paces

As for a short range bullwhacker, the Marlin Guide Gun in .45-70 fills that bill pretty damned admirably.

But there’s a lot to be said for this new development from Ruger.  From the days when old Bill ran the show, Ruger has been an innovator.  From the original Standard Auto to the Gunsite Scout, Ruger has produced a constant stream of high-quality firearms, generally based on a good idea taken to the next level – like how the original Blackhawk took the ancient single-action revolver and filled it with late 20th century guts.

The Ruger .450 Scout is another neat idea.  I have other rifles that will do any of the things that this Scout was made for, but that’s neither here nor there; just because I don’t need another gun doesn’t need I don’t want another gun.

Goodbye, Blue Monday

Goodbye, Blue Monday!

Thanks as usual to The Other McCain and Pirate’s Cove for the Rule Five links!

Tucker Carlson’s The Daily Caller has an Outdoors section where they regularly review guns and gear, which is a nice feature; recently they reviewed the S&W X-frame .500 S&W.

Holy shit.  Excerpt:

A few short years ago one of my best friends and I were enjoying some incredible fishing on the Naknek River in Alaska. Those big king salmon could burn off line and give anglers some heart-pounding action. Steve, my fishing and deer hunting buddy and I were in the middle of some of the best fishing you could possibly find. There were only two annoying factors bothering us—black flies and brown bears.

We could deter the black flies with our cigars most of the time. The bears on the other hand were a different matter. Frequently bears would roam around camp so you had to constantly be on the lookout when cleaning fish or attending to other chores. We were continually looking over our shoulder when wading along a tributary dumping into the river. Tracks were everywhere and we weren’t the only ones fishing the area. We are headed back to Alaska this year, fishing the same waters as before, only this time I will be carrying a peace-of-mind insurance policy—the S&W 500.

Here’s the part that caught my attention:

The revolver tips the scales a shade over 56 ounces when empty and the weight comes in handy when shooting high-octane loads.

The 25-5, in the middle.

That’s three and a half pounds, True Believers, for a five-shot revolver.  That’s a full pound heavier than my N-frame 25-5, which carries six rounds of .45 Colt.  My favored load for my Smith, as noted the other day, will blast a fist-sized chunk of wood chips out of the far side of  railroad tie – that’s plenty of power for most handgun work.

I don’t get this whole mega-handgun craze.  A sidearm should be just that, a sidearm, something that can be conveniently and unobtrusively packed around all day through the normal range of outdoor activities.  Monster handguns don’t really fit that bill, at least for someone of my not-inconsiderable stature.  Some years back I had a .44 Magnum Desert Eagle and played around with it for a while, but I didn’t much care for it; too much flash and bang for the added power over the .45 Colt, and it was far too heavy to be easily packed around.  I haven’t fired one of the mega-Smiths, but I suspect the same would prove true.

If you are in big bear country and need the kind of power one of the major-league Alaska bruins merits, carry a rifle or a pump shotgun stoked with hard-cast slugs.  You’ll be a lot better protected, and if you’re going to carry a firearm that will be inconvenient and in your way while fishing, you may as well go all the way.

 

Animal’s Hump Day News

Happy Hump Day!

Let’s talk about gunbelts and holsters for outdoor work.  No concealed-carry stuff here – let’s discuss rigs for carrying a heavy, powerful belt gun for serious work.

But before we do that, let’s talk about the gun.

While I favor my Glock 36 for everyday concealed carry, for outdoor work I like a big-bore wheelgun.  When woods-bumming, I usually have either my S&W 25-5 or my Ruger Vaquero, both in .45 Colt.  If I take it in my head to carry a semi-auto, it’s either the 1911 or the Glock 21, both (obviously) .45 ACPs.  In the revolvers I like 8 grains of Unique behind a Lasercast 250-grain hard-cast flat point.  That load will blow through a railroad tie and knock a big handful of splinters out the far side, and will easily lengthwise a big mulie or a cow elk.

For the .45 ACP I like the 200 grain Lasercast semi-wadcutter.  Like most Glocks, my 21 will feed almost anything; the 1911 is a little fussier but will feed SWCs fine with a good magazine.  I use Kimber magazines, and the 1911 will feed empty cases with those.

The gun belt and holster should be comfortable and solid.  Choice of material is up to the shooter; some like nylon web belts and holsters, and there is certainly nothing wrong with such a rig; I’ve used many myself.  But it’s hard to beat good leather.  Heavy harness leather should be used in the belt, and good stout bullhide in the holster.  A heavy leather rig will start out very stiff, but wear and the application of a softening oil, like neatsfoot oil,  will soon make the rig softer and more wearable.

For my belt guns, I like the America’s Gun Store #110 Wyoming Drop belt with the #114 Cheyenne holster, which rig hangs the but of the gun at about wrist height when your arms are hanging naturally.  I find this near perfect for being able to get the gun into action quickly; as long as you use the leg tie down to hold the holster in place, you can wipe off the holster’s hammer loop with the shooting hand’s thumb just as your fingers wrap around the grip.  Train yourself to keep your finger off the trigger while drawing; cock the single-action or start the double-action pull after you have cleared leather and are already pushing the muzzle of the piece towards the target.

Lots of folks like the Threepersons holster as well, and the same statements apply.

If your stomping grounds tend to be wet and snowy/rainy, like the Pacific Northwest or Alaska, Great America’s also makes their very nice K #17 flap holster, which keeps weather off the gun but makes it take longer to bring the piece to bear.

Whichever rig you choose, keep it clean (saddle soap and water) and softened, and it will give many, many years of solid service.

Rule Five Man Test Friday

On the Friday of this Memorial Day weekend during which we commemorate fallen heroes, and due to the current upswing in appearances of Beta Males, I’ve decided to re-run the classic Animal Man Test.   Are you an Alpha Male?  Take the test and find out.  Count one for every point you can answer in the affirmative; your total score is, well, your total score.  Grading is at the end.  Feel free to post your results in the comments.

Personal Hygiene
1. I use soap in the shower. A bar of soap.
2. I do not use body washes.
3. I do not trim or pluck my eyebrows.
4. I do not get manicures.
5. I do not put any lotions, oils, balms or creams on my body unless there is some purpose either medicinal or sexual.
6. I have a “haircut,” not a “hair style.”
7. I can wash my hair with soap and a washcloth.
8. I do not wear cologne. Perfume is for girls. Aftershave is acceptable, as long as it’s Old Spice.
9. I can go from ‘asleep’ to ‘ready to leave for work/movie/date’ in under fifteen minutes.

Personal Style
10. I own a pair of cowboy boots or engineer boots.
11. I own more than one pair of cowboy boots and/or engineer boots.
12. I own a cowboy hat.
13. I own more than one cowboy hat.
14. I own more than one cap with a logo from either a car company, heavy equipment manufacturer, or an agricultural supplier.
15. I do not use an umbrella. If it rains, I have caps and hats.
16. I know the difference between a cap and a hat.
17. I own a leather jacket.
18. I own a black leather jacket.
19. I have scars.
20. I have scars that I brag about.
21. I have scars from gunshot wounds.
22. I carry a pocketknife.
23. I hang stuff on my belt.

Driving
24. I can drive a manual transmission.
25. I can drive a motorcycle.
26. I can drive a commercial truck.
27. I can operate almost any vehicle on two, four or more wheels, from a motorbike to a five-ton truck.
28. I can operate tracked machinery (i.e. Caterpillar.)
29. I can operate a light airplane.
30. I own a truck.
31. I own a four-wheel drive truck.
32. My truck has branch scrapes and rock chips. Lots of them.
33. I carry jumper cables in my truck.
34. I carry a high-lift jack in my truck.
35. I carry a tow strap in my truck.
36. I carry an axe in my truck.
37. I carry a gun in my truck.

Outdoors
38. I can navigate with map and compass.
39. I can navigate by orienteering.
40. I can run a chainsaw.
41. I can start a fire without match or lighter.
42. I am proficient with a pistol
43. I am proficient with a rifle.
44. I am proficient with a shotgun.
45. I can make improvised traps.
46. I can capture, kill, prepare and cook wildlife.
47. I can catch fish with purchased fishing tackle.
48. I can catch fish with fishing tackle improvised from materials obtained in the wild.
49. I can build an improvised shelter with materials obtained in the wild.

Entertainment
50. I do not see “chick” movies unless there is a chance that I might get sex afterwards by so doing.
51. John Wayne is, very nearly, a deity.
52. I love Westerns. Especially John Wayne Westerns.
53. I enjoy movies that feature:
•    Hot vampire chicks in black leather.
•    Hot any kind of chicks in black leather.
•    Hot any kind of chicks.
•    Killer androids.
•    Killer aliens.
•    Zombies.
•    Hot vampire android alien zombie chicks.
54. Tom Cruise is the result of a Communist plot to demoralize America by subjecting us to crappy acting.

Food
55. Vegetarian, my ass. Give me a steak.
56. The four major food groups are: Steak, pizza, beer and cheeseburgers.
57. Real men eat any damn thing they want.
58. I love bacon with near-religious passion.
59. All foods should be served with home fries and/or corn bread.
60. Everything’s better with Tabasco.
Scoring:

Total up the number of question you can honestly answer “yes.”
55+ – You’re a manly man in the manliest form.

50+ – Your testosterone level is normal, but you’re not blowing up anyone’s skirts.

< 50 – Oh, for crying out loud, cowboy up already.

Notes on my own score:
Of course I scored 60/60, I wrote the test.
5. Trust me, you do not want to know.
14. Mine include Ford, CAT Diesel Power, J&W Meat Processing and Pioneer Seed.
21. Yes, I really do.
29. I can, but it’s been a long time. A looooonnnng time.

Goodbye, Blue Monday

Goodbye, Blue Monday!

Thanks again to Pirate’s Cove for the Rule Five links!

I never receive any fiscal recompense for any products I talk about in these virtual pages; hell, I never receive any fiscal recompense for anything I do here, except for selling the odd book here and there.  I do this for fun, for my own amusement, and to occasionally spark some discussion or (hopefully) make someone think a new way about an old issue.  So, when I endorse any commercial product, it’s because I use that product myself and think it’s great.

Being the sort of guy who loves the outdoors, robust living and The Manly Arts, for decades now I’ve stuck to my tested and true Carhartt jeans.  They are stout, sturdy, rugged and fit me pretty well.

But just recently, I’ve changed my mind.  I still advocate Carhartt clothing in general, including their jeans, but I’ve found a new jeans maker that supports my preferences (and my somewhat expanded, late-middle-age body) better and more comfortably.  That new jeans maker, of course, being Duluth Trading Company.

I recently bought a pair of their Men’s Ballroom 5-Pocket Jeans.  These things are great!  The name “Ballroom” derives from the extra gusset sewn into the jeans right where the denim meets your nether regions; it adds a little space in precisely the right spot, greatly increasing comfort and flexibility.

There’s more.  These jeans’ waistband is lined with stout canvas; the front pockets are heavy canvas as well.  The hem of the pants legs are likewise lined with canvas.  The denim is heavy, strong and tightly triple-stitched at the seams.  The fly zipper would not be out of place on a big canvas wall tent.

These jeans are comfortable, durable and tough.  I’ve found a new brand.  I’ll be trying more of their products as time goes on; I think next I’ll try the Men’s Free Swingin’ Flannel shirt.  I’m a big fan of flannel shirts for cool weather – flannel is, after all, America’s fabric – and these look like good ones.

Also, Duluth Trading’s commercials are even entertaining!  Give ’em a look, True Believers.  This is some good tough stuff.

I’m a Lumberjack…

Over at The Daley Gator, blogger pal Doug Hagin had an article (rightly) criticizing Bill Nye, the engineer who pretends to be a science guy; but the thing that jumped out at me was this photo.

I commented:  Regarding Lumberjack Guy above – look at those soft white hands! This gomer has never been near an axe or chainsaw in his life. The “outdoor” setting is probably at the edge of the parking lot for the photography studio.

We see plenty of these types around now; flannel and neck-beards have suddenly become popular among Millennial townies.  What will it be next – camouflage and Confederate flags?

Hey, everyone has the right to wear what they like.  I tend towards boots and my big gus-crown cowboy hats, even when bumming around town.  Now I grew up in a rural setting, and have run many a chainsaw and axe in my life – still do, from time to time.

But I can’t help looking down my nose a little bit at douchebaggery like that exhibited by the guy illustrated at top.  Wearing flannel and a neckbeard doesn’t make you manly.

Doing manly things, practicing the Manly Arts – that does.

Animal’s Daily Cigar Aficionado News

The Obama Administration was, to put it mildly, not friendly to manufacturers of fine cigars.  The incoming Trump team may be looking to reverse that.  Excerpt:

Late last week, U.S. Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., the incoming chairman of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, met with President-elect Donald Trump and submitted a list of 232 items that could be repealed immediately after Trump’s Jan. 20 inauguration.

“We must undo Obama’s harmful regulatory regime that has hurt hardworking Americans across the nation,” the group said in language akin to Trump’s campaign rhetoric.

One item in the report entitled “First 100 Days: Rules, Regulations and Executive Orders to Examine, Revoke and Issue” recommends stripping the U.S. Food and Drug Administration of its authority to regulate tobacco products.

The move could save at least 2,600 Florida jobs currently at risk and spare many businesses, according to Mark Pursell, CEO of the International Premium Cigar and Pipe Retailers Association.

Progressive-liberal firebrand U.S. Rep. Alan Grayson, D-Fla., who’s no fan of Republicans, urged the executive branch agency to back off premium cigars when it first began targeting the industry through a proposed administrative rule in 2014, but to no avail.

In a letter to FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg, Grayson said that “the premium cigar industry is responsible for employing an estimated 20,000 Americans, and realizes almost $2 billion in annual revenue.”

The incoming Trump administration could extinguish the economic hardship on day one, according to Meadows.

Personally, I’m not concerned about the crappy, cheap-ass flavored cigarillos sold in liquor stores – except as a matter of principle.  I’m personally concerned about more upscale cigars like my favored Cosechero maduros.  But, moving back to those matters of principle, I’ll repeat something that has been a running theme here since I began keeping these virtual pages:  It is not the role of government to protect people from the consequences of their own bad decisions.

Nor is it the role of government to use the power of taxation to influence decisions that the Top Men in government don’t approve.  That’s what the Obama Administration has done with the various rules on fine cigars.  That’s what the incoming Trump Administration will, hopefully, undo.

Animal’s Hump Day News

Happy Hump Day!
Happy Hump Day!

Programming note:  I’ll be flying to Tokyo on Sunday for a two-week gig, so look for some interesting travel posts.

Now, today:  Thoughts on the classic shotgun collection!

Since I now have both 12 and 16 gauge versions of the renowned Winchester Model 12 and Browning Auto-5 shotguns – one of that latter being the sought-after Sweet Sixteen version – I’m casting thoughts not only to 20-gauge versions of those guns but also to another iconic American scattergun, the Winchester 1897.

The 1897 is an interesting piece.  Designed by the DaVinci of firearms, the ’97 was the first commercially manufactured 1897-winchester-ipump-action shotgun.  It was used by the U.S. military in WW1 and WW2 as a trench broom, as well as being sold in a variety of sporting versions including the Black Diamond trap guns.  Being an aficionado of trap shooting myself, a Black Diamond Winchester would be a neat addition, but there are plenty of 12 and 16 gauge guns available.

There’s another unique feature of the 97 – its external hammer.  There is no other safety on these guns, but I have always been of the notion that a gun with an external hammer needs no other safety, and besides which the only real effective safety on a gun is the one between the shooter’s ears.

If I decide to go down this road, one thing I may eschew in a restoration is the addition of choke tubes.  While I have done this on other guns (and I highly recommend using Briley for these conversions – you get what you pay for, especially on old Winchesters with their notoriously thin barrel walls) it seems appropriate to keep this historic gun more or less as is.

I haven’t made up my mind yet, but if I run across a particularly fine example, I may not be able to resist the purchase, especially if a Black Diamond gun is in the deal.

1897-winchester-ii 1897-winchester-iii

Animal’s Daily Hunting News

img_0910
Yr. obdt. looking over some Grand County elk country.

Our annual elk hunt, abbreviated as it was by some sudden travel plans, ended with an empty sack.  Note that I do not say “ended sadly,” as any time spent in the great Western outdoors is never cause for anything but happiness.

We had one good shot at filling one of our cow elk tags.  Near the spot shown above, loyal sidekick Rat heard an elk mew softly in the timber.  We split up and stalked into the pines in a pincer movement towards the patch of pines where the sound came from.

Rat overlooking the same country.
Rat overlooking the same country.

As we moved in, through the heavy dark timber I saw a pair of elk legs moving slowly upslope.  I moved up to a large pine, found an opening in the trees, and braced against the tree to place Thunder Speaker’s scope on the opening.  I saw an orange elk butt moving towards the opening from the left at a range of about fifty yards; then I saw in the scope a bit of elk neck, then an ear, then the head…

…then an antler.  It was a young raghorn bull, and we had cow tags.  Oh well.

Anyway, it was a highly enjoyable week.  Photos follow.